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Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station (Salem, Oregon)
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Object NameSalem Southern Pacific Railroad Station (Salem, Oregon)
ViewNational Register of Historic Places Registration Form. Prepared by Julie Osborn, Janice Catlin Calpo, David Skilton, and Hazel Patton
Creator/RoleJ. H. Christie (architect)
Stebinger Brothers (builder/contractor)
CreatorChristie, J. H.
Stebinger Brothers
Date1918
Decade1910-1919
CitySalem
CountyMarion
State/ProvinceOregon
CountryUnited States
Site Detail500 13th Avenue Southeast
Photograph Date2009
CatalogerEdward H. Teague
Object Typearchitecture
built works
views (visual works)
exterior views
transportation buildings
railroad stations
railroads
plans (orthographic projections)
floor plans
architectural drawings (visual works)
Period/StyleLate Victorian; Queen Anne; Beaux Arts
SignficanceNational Register of Historic Places (Listed, 2010)
NotesSalem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State 5. Classification Ownership of Property ( Check as many boxes as apply) Category of Property ( Check only one box) Number of Resources within Property ( Do not include previously listed resources in the count.) private X building( s) Contributing Non- Contributing public - Local district 2 buildings X public - State site sites public - Federal structure structures object objects 2 0 Total Name of related multiple property listing ( Enter " N/ A" if property is not part of a multiple property listing) Number of contributing resources previously listed in the National Register N/ A 0 6. Function or Use Historic Functions ( Enter categories from instructions) Current Functions ( Enter categories from instructions) TRANSPORTATION: rail- related TRANSPORTATION: rail- related 7. Description Architectural Classification ( Enter categories from instructions) Materials ( Enter categories from instructions) LATE VICTORIAN: Queen Anne foundation: CONCRETE LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY REVIVALS: walls: BRICK Beaux Arts roof: ASPHALT other: WOOD Narrative Description ( Describe the historic and current condition of the property on one or more continuation sheets) Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State 8. Statement of Significance Applicable National Register Criteria ( Mark " x" in one or more boxes for the criteria qualifying the property for National Register listing) X A Property is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history. B Property is associated with the lives of persons significant in our past. X C Property embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction or represents the work of a master, or possesses high artistic values, or represents a significant and distinguishable entity whose components lack individual distinction. D Property has yielded, or is likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history. Criteria Considerations ( Mark " x" in all the boxes that apply) Property is: A owed by a religious institution or used for religious purposes. B removed from its original location. C a birthplace or grave. D a cemetery. E a reconstructed building, object, or structure. F a commemorative property. G less than 50 years old or achieving significance within the past 50 years. Areas of Significance ( Enter categories from instructions) TRANSPORTATION ARCHITECTURE Period of Significance 1918 Significant Dates 1918 Significant Person ( Complete if Criterion B is marked above) N/ A Cultural Affiliation N/ A Architect/ Builder J. H. Christie, SP Architect; Stebinger Bros. ( Portland), Contractor Narrative Statement of Significance ( Explain the significance of the property on one or more continuation sheets) 9. Major Bibliographical References Bibliography ( Cite the books, articles, and other sources used in preparing this form on one or more continuation sheets) Previous documentation on file ( NPS): Primary location of additional data: preliminary determination of individual listing ( 36 CFR 67 has been X State Historic Preservation Office requested Other State agency previously listed in the National Register Federal agency previously determined eligible by the National Register Local government ____ designated a National Historic Landmark University recorded by Historic American Buildings Survey #____________ Other recorded by Historic American Engineering Record # ____________ Name of repository: Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State 10. Geographical Data Acreage of Property 2.71 acres UTM References ( Place additional UTM references on a continuation sheet) 1 10 497860 4975240 3 Zone Easting Northing Zone Easting Northing 2 4 Zone Easting Northing Zone Easting Northing Verbal Boundary Description ( Describe the boundaries of the property on a continuation sheet) Boundary Justification ( Explain why the boundaries were selected on a continuation sheet) 11. Form Prepared By name/ title Julie Osborn, Janice Catlin Calpo, David Skilton, and Hazel Patton organization date July 2009; rev. Dec. 2009 street & number 3251 Bluff Avenue SE telephone ( 503) 949- 5372 city or town Salem state Oregon zip code 97302 Additional Documentation Submit the following items with the completed form: Continuation Sheets Maps: A USGS map ( 7.5 or 15 minute series) indicating the property's location. A Sketch map for historic districts and properties having large acreage or numerous resources. Photographs: Representative black and white photographs of the property. Additional items: ( Check with the SHPO or FPO for any additional items) Property Owner name State of Oregon, Oregon Department of Transportation, Attn: James Norman, Cultural Resources Manager street & number 355 Capitol Street telephone ( 503) 986- 3514 city or town Salem state Oregon zip code 97301 Paperwork Reduction Act Statement: This information is being collected for applications to the National Register of Historic Places to nominate properties for listing or determine eligibility for listing, to list properties, and to amend existing listings. Response to this request is required to obtain a benefit in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act, as amended ( 16 U. S. C. 460 et seq.). Estimated Burden Statement: Public reporting burden for this form is estimated to average 18.1 hours per response including time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining data, and completing and reviewing the form. Direct comments regarding this burden estimate or any aspect of this form to the Chief, Administrative Services Division, National Park Service, PO Box 37127, Washington, DC 20013- 7127; and the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reductions Project ( 1024- 0018), Washington, DC 20503. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 7 Page 1 DESCRIPTION SUMMARY The Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station stands today where it was constructed in 1917- 18, between the tracks and Thirteenth Street SE just south of the latter's compound intersection with Bellevue Street SE and Twelfth Street SE. This site was also the location of two previous stations, dating from 1871 and 1889 respectively. The current buff brick, Beaux Arts style main building has been in continuous use as a passenger station since it was completed, but the associated REA Depot has not been used as a shipping facility since the mid 1970s. This latter building is a salvaged remnant ( essentially the baggage room) of the 1889 station, which was a wooden, Queen Anne style, structure. The 1889 station suffered a disastrous fire during the night of March 5, 1917, the day before the U. S entered World War I. Eventually moved about one- hundred feet south of its original location and rotated one-hundred eighty degrees, the baggage room of the 1889 building was rehabilitated for freight handling by the Railway Express Agency ( REA). Both buildings exhibit a high degree of physical integrity within their 1918- 1952 context. The passenger station is in very good condition, having undergone a complete historic rehabilitation in 1999; the REA Depot is currently mothballed in fair but stable condition. At the time of the preparation of this nomination, there are no known plans for the use of the REA Depot. The property is owned by the Rails Division of the Oregon Department of Transportation. LOCATION AND SETTING The nominated property is intact with regard to its location, but its surroundings have changed gradually and significantly over its lifetime. When the railroad first reached Salem in 1871, the station was located at this site, rather remote from downtown, both in anticipation of the city's eastward growth, and so the rail line could more easily take advantage of Turner Gap, a level opening through the Salem Hills. By 1918, when the current complex was opened, the community had indeed begun to surround this location. There were several large mill and warehouse complexes in the immediate vicinity, including the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, extant today as the Mission Mill Museum, and listed in the National Register since 1973. Willamette University and the State of Oregon were also developing property to the northwest, and areas of mill worker and middle class housing were scattered to the west, south, and east. Although nearby streets have been widened and surrounding development is now denser and more refined in character, the immediate surroundings of the complex are similar today to their character during the latter part of the historic period. Two noteworthy additions to this context are a six- lane concrete highway overpass about 750' south of the station complex, which carries Mission Street SE ( Oregon Highway 22) over the rails and Thirteenth Street; and a smaller pedestrian overpass about 675' to the north, which joins Willamette University and Tokyo International University across Twelfth Street. An entrance ramp to the highway bridge reaches grade approximately 100' south- southwest of the REA depot. And finally, although a millrace still operates to the north of the site and Sheldon Ditch forms its southern boundary, several other nearby ditches which historically delivered water to mills in the vicinity have been filled since the mid- 1920s. DESIGN, MATERIALS, AND WORKMANSHIP Station Building The overall massing of the station building consists of three flat- roofed rectilinear volumes, a large central pavilion, flanked to the north and south by two substantially smaller, lower wings. In keeping with the Beaux Arts style, the Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 7 Page 2 entire composition is formal in character, roughly symmetrical on both axes, and unified by the consistent use of buff brick and cream colored pre- cast concrete trims. Ornamental motifs are mixed in source but all classically inspired. The central section, having a footprint of 70' x 39', rises to a height of approximately 25'; the two wings are 25' x 26' in footprint and approximately 15' tall. The larger central mass contains only the full- height passenger waiting room, while the wings house " service" functions such as ticketing, restrooms, offices, luggage handling, storage, and ( historically) telegraph signaling ( see attached drawings). The west or main entrance façade of the central pavilion is the most detailed and ornamented portion of the exterior of the building. It is organized as a three- part composition, with two narrower vertical blocks framing a wide, shallowly recessed, porch. A continuous stepped frieze band and cornice of pre- cast concrete crowns this entire facade, jogging forward slightly above the two flanking blocks. The cornice in turn bears a brick parapet with a cast-concrete trim cap. The parapet includes three segments of open balustrade aligned above the bays of the porch below. The parapet caps above the flanking blocks are detailed as slightly gabled forms. The structure above the porch recess is supported by four tall Ionic columns that subdivide it into three bays, each containing a full- scale Roman arched opening. A pair of substantial glass entry doors is centered in the middle bay, and the outer two contain windows above a waist- high cast concrete base and water table. All three of these openings are topped with sloped masonry hoods supported on pairs of scroll- shaped, fluted brackets. Above the hoods, large single- pane window fill out the remainder of the arched openings. The identical flanking blocks are in themselves composed symmetrically, with wide brick pilasters on either side of a punched, tripartite, masonry-trimmed window, exhibiting the same sill and head heights, and bracket- supported hoods as those in the porch. An oculus window with a similar scroll- shaped bracket as an ornamental keystone is centered in the wall above the main window. The rail- platform- facing east façade of the central block is essentially similar in composition to the front. The principal differences are that the porch recess is eliminated, with the columns becoming flattened and engaged, and a deep marquise canopy, suspended by four steel rods, providing weather protection between the building and the tracks. The side walls of the central block are generally obscured by the two utilitarian dependencies and like them display a lesser degree of detail and ornamentation. They are bounded by pilasters at the sides which continue the composition of the front and rear facades around the building corners, and their parapets each include two sections of balustrade. As noted above, the two smaller wings of the Station Building are lower than the central pavilion. Their cornices and parapets are simplified, they exhibit a much higher proportion of wall to opening, and their windows and doors, although trimmed with the same materials, do not include the hood treatment seen on the main part of the building. Each wing displays a similar pattern of openings on its front- facing and track sides; the south wing having a large window and a cargo door on both sides, and the north having one large window and one smaller, higher one on both sides. Each wing has three of the narrow band of high windows centered on its outer wall, facing north and south respectively. As mentioned above, the interior of the Station Building is organized as a large central waiting hall with supporting rooms to the sides. The organization of the minor spaces is best understood by reference to the attached drawings. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 7 Page 3 In 1999, the Oregon Department of Transportation conducted a full rehabilitation of the 1918 depot. In 1991, Congress passed the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act ( ISTEA) which, among other things, set aside funds for improving passenger rail service. Using that funding source, the Oregon Department of Transportation purchased the station from the Southern Pacific Railroad for about $ 600,000 in 1995. The department spent another $ 1 million in federal ISTEA funds to restore the station. 1 The work included removing the changes that had been made in the 1950s when a new heating and air conditioning system was installed, as well as a false ceiling that dropped the ceiling level from 24 to approximately nine feet. The 1950s ceiling blocked the view of the high arched windows and two 30- inch diameter glass globe chandeliers also were removed. The 1999 restoration/ rehabilitation project included removing the dropped ceilings, restoring the historic decorative coved ceilings with medallions, and installing reproduction glass globe chandeliers. The work also included improvement of parking facilities, some rail- side pedestrian features such as waiting shelters, lighting and landscaping for high- speed rail systems and park and ride operations. Railway Express Agency Depot When the 1889 depot burned just prior to World War I, the freight portion was saved and moved south along the tracks. The former freight depot/ baggage shed maintains a high degree of architectural integrity both inside and outside. The exterior continues to display one of the finest features: triangular, scroll- sawn brackets placed among the overhanging eaves surrounding the building. The peak of the roof features small gables protruding from the end points which tied it to the Queen Ann railroad architecture of the 1889 station. This building at one time housed the Salem Telegraph Express and store room. This building, 65' x 25' in footprint and with 15' high walls, has a low- pitched ( 6/ 12) hip roof with very deep overhanging eaves. The ridge extends several feet beyond its intersections with the hip rafters at both ends, forming small gable extensions. The main wall cladding is horizontally applied 1" x 6" lapped siding with a simple bevel detail along the upper edge of the face. Above this horizontal siding, which reaches to about 9' above grade, the combination of a board and batten frieze and widely spaced pairs of ornate roof brackets provides the principle ornamentation of the building. The bracket struts, sawn from 2"- thick lumber, have a curving outer face with stylized foliate elements at the top and bottom, and where they reach the wall they transition into a foliate pendant element attaching to a vertical 1" x 4" board applied over the siding from ground level to the top of the wall. The inner edge of each strut is straight, forming an equilaterally triangular space in combination with the wall and the rafter tail it is supporting. These spaces are filled in with 1" thick board panels pierced by a centered 10" diameter hole and three 2" diameter holes in the corners. The frieze band starts with a horizontal 1" x 8" board applied over the siding at the level where the roof brackets meet the walls. Above this board a pattern of vertical 1" x 6" boards and bead- edged 1" x 2" battens extends up to a horizontal 1" x 12" board which butts into the bottom of the rafter blocking. The ornamental treatment is completed by the exposed, bevel- edged, 1" x 4" tongue- and- groove roof sheathing. There are four exterior doors on the building. Two of these are large, single- leaf, rolling freight doors which open opposite one other about a third of the way down the east and west faces of the building from the north end. These give access to the freight room. On the west face a standard 2'- 6" x 6'- 8" door opens into the offices approximately 1 http:// www. salemhistory. net/ transportation/ passenger_ station. htm - Researched and prepared by Paul Porter and Susan Gibby. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 7 Page 4 twenty- five feet south of the freight door. On the south face, at the southeast corner, an unusual three- segment rolling door is designed to fold and slide inward on an overhead track, creating a third freight opening. All the doors swing or slide into the building. The predominant window type is a wooden, twelve pane sash ( two rows of six lights each) that pivots on its longer horizontal center axis. There are four of these windows extant on the building, one on each face, and they appear in photos of the building in its earlier incarnation as part of the 1889 station building. There are also three one- over- one double- hung type windows that appear to have been added in 1918 when the salvaged former freight room took on its new role as Salem's Railway Express Agency depot. The interior of the REA Depot is divided into a large, open room occupying the northern two- thirds of its footprint, and a complex of two office rooms and a short hallway at the south. The walls and ceilings are clad with painted 1" x 6" tongue- and- groove boards. The floor is a concrete slab. As of the date of this nomination ( 2009), the building is vacant and has been " mothballed" through the installation of a new roof and " Typar" weather protection wrapping around the exterior walls, to protect it until plans are established for its future use. FEELING AND ASSOCIATION The station complex, comprised as it was historically of two buildings on a large and open property adjacent to an active rail line, clearly evokes the experiences of early twentieth- century rail travel and parcel shipping. As the oldest site in Salem directly connected with passenger railroad service, and one which has been in continuous use for that purpose since 1871, the Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station site also retains a high degree of integrity of association. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 1 STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE SUMMARY The Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station property, consisting of the Main Depot ( built 1918) and the Rail Express Agency Depot ( part of the 1889 depot salvaged and moved in 1918), is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A in the area of railroad transportation as Salem's only intact depot buildings associated with early twentieth- century passenger rail service and express package delivery. Both buildings are also significant under Criterion C as rare surviving examples of Beaux Arts Classical and Queen Anne architectural styles applied to the design of train stations in Oregon. The period of significance begins and ends in 1918. Both buildings were determined eligible for listing in the National Register by the National Park Service on March 17, 1982. SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD HISTORICAL OVERVIEW In 1868, construction of what would become the Oregon California Railroad began when two competing companies initiated railroad from Portland through the Willamette Valley. Each of the Oregon entrepreneur groups, one from Portland and one from Salem, wanted to be the first company to connect with the Central Pacific Railroad that was building the western portion of the transcontinental railroad from Sacramento, California to Promontory, Utah. The rival railroad companies began rail construction on either side of the Willamette River in Portland, with Joseph Gaston and his supporters from Portland on the west side, and a group supported by Salem sponsors on the east side. Both factions started construction in April 1868. The two companies engaged in a competition to cross the Clackamas River ( 20- miles upstream) by the end of December 1869. The two companies' legal and political battle enticed a Kentucky- born native named Ben Holladay. Holladay, who came west to operate the Pony Express, steamship, and stage operations, quickly involved himself in the railroad venture. Under Holladay's guidance, the east- side company won federal favor, and the last spike was driven on December 24, 1869. In March 1870, Holladay purchased the west- side company and reorganized his railroad company under the name of Oregon & California Railroad. Under Holladay's control, construction of the railroad reached Salem in 1870, just in time for the State Fair celebration. By 1887, the Central Pacific controlled the Oregon & California Railroad, placing the entire line between California and Oregon under the same name. At the same time, the Southern Pacific Railroad was incorporated. All affiliated railroads, including the Central Pacific and the Oregon & California Railroads, were then leased to the Southern Pacific. 1 Despite the legal and financial difficulties during the construction of the railroad through the Willamette Valley, the cities and towns along the line became dependent on the railroad for transportation of goods and passengers. America's entry into the first World War ( April 6, 1917) found Southern Pacific's management immediately alert to the gigantic transportation task it would be called on to perform with other railroads. Government control and operation of the nation's railroads became effective at noon on December 28, 1917. Over Southern Pacific lines and elsewhere throughout the country, railroad facilities were consolidated, in some respects, for unified operations. The 1 Erle, Health " 75 years of Progress: An Historical Sketch of the Southern Pacific, 1989- 1944" transcribed and edited by Bruce C. Cooper, Bulletin, 1944, www. cprr. org/ Museum/ SP_ 169- 1944/ index. html. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 2 war ended less than eleven months after the government took over the railroads, but the properties were not returned to private operation until 12: 01 a. m., March 1, 1920. Out of wartime operations the railroads, the government and the nation's shippers gained valuable experiences. The need of organizational set- ups to work out a program for efficient, smooth functioning of railroad services was obvious. The government, through its military, naval and other agencies, along with the shippers, perfected rail transportation procedures in a highly coordinated degree of teamwork with the railroads that was to pay off handsomely some twenty years later when rumblings of another war emergency gripped the nation. 2 The Southern Pacific built both the 1889 Salem station, represented by today's surviving REA Depot, and the 1918 Station Building. In spite of periodic competition from new railroad companies, the Southern Pacific continued to dominate the railroad industry in western Oregon throughout the twentieth century. It operated this line until 1998, when it was absorbed by the Union Pacific Railroad following bankruptcy. Parallel with the growth of the railroads, an industry developed around the delivery of packages beginning in the mid- nineteenth century. As Oregon and other western states developed and joined the Union the Wells Fargo Company was preeminent in this arena, first using horse- drawn wagons for delivery, and then relying increasingly on railroads. However, with the rise of motor freight options in the early twentieth century the landscape of the industry began to shift. In 1907 the predecessor of today's United Parcel Service, the American Messenger Company, was founded in Seattle, Washington, and in 1913 the United States Post Office initiated its own Parcel Post service. This service was operated out of the REA Depot, the refurbished baggage room of the 1889 train station. Just prior to World War I, the passenger portion of the railroad station burned. 3 BRIEF HISTORY OF SALEM, OREGON The Kalapuya Native Americans lived in the mid- Willamette area for more than 5,000 years. By 1812 fur trappers traveled to the Salem region and some remained and turned to farming. A few decades later, in 1840, Jason Lee, a Methodist missionary, settled along the Willamette River where Salem would be developed, building a home and a grist mill. On January 13, 1851, the state capital was moved from Oregon City to Salem. Transportation and communication expanded in the mid- nineteenth century with the arrival of the Hoosier, a steamboat, in 1851, that traveled the Willamette River south to the city of Eugene and north to Oregon City, near Portland. Located between the Cascade and Coast mountain ranges of Oregon, the City of Salem was incorporated in 1860. As Salem grew, the town began to take its current shape with its business district located close to the river. Salem's population was 2,500 by 1880. The city's growth accelerated with the expansion of agriculture and logging, and the continued development of national and international markets. Food processing plants and woolen mills, such as the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, formed the base of Salem's economy. Telegraph service arrived in Salem in 1864. 2 Eric Heath, " 75- Years of Progress: An Historical Sketch of the Southern Pacific, 1869- 1944" transcribed and edited by Bruce C. Cooper, Bulletin, 1944, http:// cprr. org/ Museum/ SP_ 1869- 1944/ index. html 3 The baggage room/ freight house was saved from destruction by the fire and was relocated north of its original location to clear the site for the construction of a new passenger station and depot. Toward the end of World War I, just as the current Salem Train Station was being built, the seven leading parcel shippers in the country ( including Wells Fargo) reached an agreement with the federal government whereby they would form the Railway Express Agency ( REA). In return for a commitment to deliver anywhere within the United States, the REA was granted a monopoly on the movement of non- postal packages by train. In 1929 a consortium of railroads purchased REA, operating it as an independent company until 1975, when it was declared bankrupt and dissolved. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 3 n area. Salem's first bridge across the Willamette River was built in 1886. During the 1890s, Salem's streets were improved and its water and sewer systems were installed. The railroad came to Salem in 1870 and the first depot was constructed in 1871. The local townspeople wanted the station located close in, convenient to the business and residential areas clustered around Commercial Street. However, they balked at paying the additional $ 30,000 the railroad wanted for laying track to the center of town. So the station was built on the north- south route, over a mile east of downtown, amidst the hay fields and groves of trees. After fire destroyed the depot in 1885, a new Queen Anne depot was built in 1889 in the same location. 4 Citizens complained about the distance they had to travel to deliver and pick up passengers and their baggage " way out on 12th Street." Several street car lines were developed that helped alleviate that problem. The Sanborn Fire Insurance map from 1926 ( see Figure 2) illustrates that the Salem downtown area was contained with " an iron ring." Twelfth Street marked the line dividing the downtown from the " suburbs" to the east, an area that began to develop in the 1890s. A spur track ran west along Trade Street to Front Street, and a freight depot was built on the northeast corner of Trade and Front Streets c. 1890.5 The Oregon Electric Line ran north and south along Front Street between Trade and Union. 6 Along Union Street, a Falls City Branch line ran east and west between the Willamette River and 12th Street. These lines formed a ring of railroad tracks that encircled the downtow 7 First, in 1888, a horse- drawn street railway, owned by the Oregon Land Company, was operated by the Salem Street Railway Company in a station on the corner of State and Commercial. The line ran from the downtown terminal at 311 Commercial Street to 12th Street and eventually along 12th to the Southern Pacific depot, where the 1889 station served as a turn- around for the horse- drawn streetcars. Within a year there were five miles of track, five cars, 17 horses, and eight to nine men were regularly employed. 8 Secondly, an electric car system extended service to east Salem in 1889. A power horse provided with a steam- and water- powered dynamo was built on Trade Street along North Mill Creek. In May 1890, a 2- 1/ 2 mile tour from downtown Salem to the penitentiary was reported to have had a very smooth ride, not a characteristic associated with the horse- drawn cars. In 1890 Salem had two sets of tracks running up Trade Street. Financial hard times in the early 1890s slowed construction of rail track. However, the car lines continued in operation until a transition was made to bus transportation along the same lines in 1927.9 4 Kadas, Marianne. Historic Context Statement, August 1992. 5 It was enlarged by 1926, and remained in this location until c. 1960 6 The Oregon Electric line also ran north and south along High Street between Trade and Union Streets. 7 Salem Long Range Planning Commission, A Long Range Plan for Salem, Oregon: First Annual Progress Report. Salem, 1947. Conde B. McCullough was chair of the commission in the mid 1940s. During this time, he created an " ordered and scientific" plan. In part, it addressed the stranglehold that the rail lines had on downtown Salem and the heavy traffic that US 99 imposed on city streets. The commission issued the 84- page first year progress report in 1947, after McCullough died. The report had his hands all over it. Much of the plan eventually came to fruition, including eliminating two of the four rail lines that encircled downtown Salem and constructing an east side highway bypass-- ultimately Interstate 5-- to take through traffic off of Salem's streets. 8 The company then began to experience financial distress and although rebounded for a while with an infusion of capital when it was renamed Salem Motor Railway Company, it went into receivership in 1897 after extending its line into Highland Addition, a new subdivision promoted by Dr. Henry Minthorn, uncle of Herbert Hoover. ( Kadas, 1992). 9 Ibid. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 4 The Oregon Electric Railroad started in Portland and ran south via Tigard, Wilsonville, Salem, Albany, and ended in Eugene. Another line went from Portland to Beaverton, Hillsboro and ended in Forest Grove. The OER was controlled by the Spokane Portland & Seattle Railway ( SP& S). The OER was the largest interurban system in Oregon. 10 Tracks ran along the Willamette Slough and south along the river with the passenger station and ticket office located in the Hubbard Building, later renamed the Oregon Building, at High and State Streets. 11 Twenty- one freight and passenger trains served the Willamette Valley daily. It was the largest railroad electrification effort in the history of the state of Oregon. The Interurban operated until car and truck travel took over the transportation field in the 1930s. The line that would later be known as the Falls City Branch of the Southern Pacific had its beginnings in 1901 as the Salem, Falls City and Western Railway. It was originally constructed to haul logs from the vast timber resources west of Falls City. In 1907, Southern Pacific took over operation of the line from Dallas to Black Rock with logging companies, like the Great Western and Willamette Valley Lumber Company, operating the logging railroads that ran west from there. The line had been completed from Black Rock to West Salem on September 13, 1909, but only after completion of the Willamette River Bridge were the trains able to actually run to the Salem depot. For a few years, the line was still known as the Salem, Falls City and Western Railroad. By 1909, the line was extended east from Dallas to West Salem, ending near the banks of the Willamette River. Southern Pacific owned tracks on the east bank of the river and ferried passengers and goods across the river to its Salem depot where passengers and freight could continue on their journey. The Salem, Falls City and Western Railway into Salem on March 8, 1913. By 1915, the entire line was entirely under Southern Pacific control and would eventually be known as the Falls City Branch of the Southern Pacific. 12 The first passenger train in West Salem arrived in 1909. Regular passenger service started a few weeks later with a kerosene- powered engine called a McKeen car, nicknamed " The Skunk" because of its exhaust fumes. The train depot was located on 2nd Street West between Kingwood Avenue and Rosemont Avenue ( it no longer exists). In 1913 a railroad bridge across the Willamette was completed by the Salem Falls City and Western Railroad Companies. ( This bridge was rehabilitated and reopened in April 2009 as a bike/ pedestrian bridge.) West Salem, on the west bank of the Willamette River and just opposite the original town site of Salem, was not annexed into the City of Salem in 1949. The 1920' s marked a decade of rapid change in Salem. In industry, the Oregon Pulp and Paper Company began operations near Pringle Creek in 1920. Medical services expanded with the opening of Salem General Hospital, and in 1923 the city established its first full- time municipal fire department. By the time the last streetcar ceased operation in 1927 ( after nearly 40 years of transporting Salem residents) the city had more than 35 miles of paved streets. Salem's economy continued to be strong during World War II as businesses turned their production to the war effort. The Southern Pacific Railroad Depot played an important role as train travel was a major source of transportation for military personnel. 13 10 http:// www. trainweb. org/ oerhs/ history/ oerwy. htm; It was part of the Spokane Portland and Seattle, later Burlington Northern, and now Burlington Northern Santa Fe. http:// www. pnwc- nrhs. org/ oregon- rr- history. html 11 This four- story, commercial block building, 147 N. High Street, now contains offices and retail spaces. It is listed in the National Register as a contributing building in the Salem Downtown Historic District. 12 http:// www. brian894x4. com/ SPFallsCityBranch. html 13 http:// www. salemhistory. net/ brief_ history/ brief_ history. htm Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 5 ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE The Southern Pacific Railroad Depot built in 1918 in the Beaux- Arts style conveys all the ideals of the " gateway to the city". Passengers entered the station from the west, passing through colossal columns encompassed by large Roman arched windows, to reach the tracks on the east. The building is dominated by a large rectangular central pavilion which houses a passenger waiting area 1,500 square feet in area. Smaller wings house functions including ticketing, baggage and rest rooms. The floor plan of the station reflected the new 20th century need of the women's waiting room. The deep west entrance is comprised of four pilaster colonnades, with the four columns directly in front and a three-arched recessed entranceway and double doors at the center. The shallower track- side entrance incorporates a colonnade of Ionic pilasters with a large metal canopy offering shelter to waiting passengers. Decorative plasterwork, coved corner entries, period radiators and Terrazzo marble floor patterns also add to the elegance of the structure. The concept of the railroad station as a point of civic pride was by this time essential to any city that wished to favorably present its social and cultural merit. Salem, capital city of Oregon, was no exception. The depot was designed by Southern Pacific architect J. H. Christie and built by Stebinger Brothers of Portland for a cost of $ 25,000. Grading, paving, landscaping, and " other" improvements ( presumably including the relocation and rehabilitation of the REA Depot) brought the total cost of the project to $ 40,000. It formally opened its doors on September 23, 1918. The concept of the railroad station as a point of civic pride was by this time essential to any city which wished to favorably present its social and cultural merit. Salem, capital city of Oregon, was no exception. It reflected the importance at the time of making a good impression, worthy of the capital. The Beaux- Arts Classicism of the new station seemed a natural choice of style for this up- and- coming city. There are no other stations in the Beaux Arts style in the state of Oregon. The Beaux Arts ( French for " fine art") style originated in the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. Many American architects studied at this legendary architectural school, where they learned about the aesthetic principles of classical design and brought them to the United States. Also known as Beaux Arts Classicism, Academic Classicism, or Classical Revival, Beaux Arts is a late and eclectic form of Neoclassicism. It combines classical architecture from ancient Greece and Rome with Renaissance ideas. Beaux Arts is characterized by order, symmetry, formal design, grandiosity, and elaborate ornamentation. In the United States, the Beaux Arts style led to planned neighborhoods with large, showy houses, wide boulevards, and vast parks. Due to the size and grandiosity of the buildings, the Beaux Arts style is most commonly used for public buildings like museums, railway stations, libraries, banks, courthouses, and government buildings. The popularity of the Beaux Arts style waned in the 1920' s, and within 25 years the buildings were considered ostentatious. Later in the 20th century, postmodernists rediscovered an appreciation of the Beaux Arts ideals. 14 HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE Train stations in early 20th- century America served as more than a simple point of ingress and egress for a city. They served as venues for important events like the send- off and welcoming home of troops during wartime. 14 http:// architecture. about. com/ od/ periodsstyles/ ig/ Historic- Styles/ Beaux- Arts.- 0cU. htm Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 6 Thousands of troops traveled through and to the station going to and from Camp Adair during 1943- 1945. Japanese American families gathered at the station before boarding trains to begin their journeys to internment camps in May of 1942. The REA Depot also served as a temporary morgue when the remains of deceased servicemen were returned for burial during World War II. The Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station also served as an important venue for speeches by politicians conducting " whistle stop" campaigns. Noteworthy campaigns include Woodrow Wilson on September 18, 1919; General John Pershing on January 21, 1920; President Harding visits the station on July 28, 1923 before his death later the same week; Franklin D. Roosevelt made a campaign stop in 1932; President Herbert Hoover visited on September 25, 1934; and Dwight Eisenhower campaigns from a train car at the station on October 7, 1952, the last time a successful presidential candidate campaigns from the station. The continued development of other transportation modes impacted the use of train service as a means of primary transportation. In 1947 and 1952 Oregon legislative sessions created a framework for limited access highways which supported auto travel. 15 The Highway Acts of 1952 and 1956 were passed by Congress to plan for and implement the interstate highway system. During approximately the same period, air travel increased in Salem. At McNary Field, which had been dedicated in August 1929, United Airlines Freight Services started February 1, 1946, dedication ceremonies for the Salem Naval Air Facility were held here August 5, 1949; the first jet to fly into Salem was an F- 80 flown by Captain C. A. Curtin from Williams Airbase in Arizona on August 20, 1948; the first airport control tower went into operation in 1949; and a $ 40,000 Airport Administration Building was dedicated on Sunday, August 7, 1950; 16 all of which opened the way for increased freight and passenger travel. In spite of the downturn in train travel, the Southern Pacific Railroad Station building continues to be used as a train depot with Amtrak passenger trains running south to Eugene and north to Seattle. The building was restored in 1999. Although several other rail station complexes existed historically in Salem, the subject property is the only surviving example. OTHER MASONRY SOUTHERN PACIFIC DEPOTS ON THE ORIGINAL MAINLINE Although there were many depots built in Oregon along the Southern Pacific lines, only five other masonry depots dating from the period of significance remain along the original mainline from Portland to Ashland: Albany ( 1908), Eugene ( 1908), Medford ( 1910), Roseburg ( 1912), and Salem ( 1918). 17 All but the Salem depot share similar characteristics, and all are built in county seats. 15 www. oregon. gov/ ODOT/ COMM/ docs? Oregon_ Interstate_ Bacground. pdf 16 http:// iwa. cityofsalem. net/ salemhistory/ transportation/ airport. htm 17 The Klamath Falls Passenger Depot, built along the Natron Cutoff, is also a masonry building that was constructed later when the new line was completed. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 8 Page 7 Albany, Linn County, Oregon ( Built 1908, Not Listed): The Albany Passenger Depot, built in 1908 concurrently with Eugene's depot, was constructed of cast concrete block. The one- story building has a hip roof, wide overhanging eaves, corbelled chimney, boxed bays, and tall double- hung windows. A porte- cochere is located on the end of the building to shelter passengers. Recently rehabilitated, the depot is used by Amtrak as a transportation center. Eugene, Lane County, Oregon ( Built 1908, Listed 8/ 16/ 2007): The Eugene Station and Passenger Depot has characteristics of several styles. The low horizontal appearance, wide overhanging eaves, large wood brackets, tall double- hung windows, and diamond- pane dormer windows are reminiscent of the Craftsman style. The red- brick construction and semi- circular bay are characteristics of the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Medford, Jackson County, Oregon ( Built 1910, Listed 6/ 3/ 1996): The Medford Passenger Depot is a one- story building that has a hip roof, tall decorative brick and stucco chimney, wide overhanging eaves supported by large brackets, multi- light double- hung wood- sash windows, and boxed bays. The exterior is covered with a rough stucco surface decorated with brick quoins, stringcourse, and door and window trim. The building was restored in 1996 and s currently used as Porters Restaurant. Roseburg, Douglas County, Oregon ( Built 1912, Not Listed): The Roseburg Passenger Depot, built in 1912, is a one- story building that has a clipped gable roof, brick chimney, dormers, wide overhanging eaves, multi- light double- hung wood- sash windows, and boxed bays. The upper portion of the depot is covered with a rough stucco surface and the lower portion with brick. The stucco gable ends are decorated with half- timbering. The Roseburg Station Restaurant is currently located in the building. CONCLUSION The Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station and REA Depot played a significant role in the growth of Oregon's state capital. Unique qualities of this historic resource that contributed to the way in which the city grew include its location. It was constructed approximately one mile away from the commercial core of the city, which necessitated the development of railways and electric car systems to connect the station to downtown. These systems essentially formed an iron ring around the downtown area. Another important aspect is the fact that the main station is the third building constructed for that purpose on the site; it was built in 1918 after the majority of the second station burned. Additionally, it is unique that what remained of the second station was made into the REA Depot when it was moved approximately 100 feet south and rotated 180 degrees. Also, the Beaux Arts style of the main station is unlike any other in the state and is interpreted to be symbolic of the importance and dignified role the capital plays in representing the entire state. Also, this site has been a primary venue for important events, including providing a gateway for military personnel and politicians to travel to and from other parts of the country and thereby connecting and influencing the growth and development of the City of Salem and its citizens. It continues to play an important role in the quality of life of the state's citizens as it allows for what is now considered an alternative, environmentally-friendly mode of transportation by reducing the use automobiles and associated fuel consumption and pollution. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 9 Page 1 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Austin, Ed and Tom Dill. The Southern Pacific in Oregon. Edmonds, Washington: Pacific Fast Mail, 1987. Culp, Edwin D. Stations West, the Story of the Oregon Railways. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, 1972. Droge, John Albert. Passenger Terminals and Trains. McGraw- Hill, New York, 1916. Grant, H. Roger and Charles W. Bohi. The Country Railroad Station in America. Pruett Publishing, Boulder, Colorado, 1978. Meeks, Carroll L. V. The Railroad Station. Yale University Press, New Haven Connecticut, 1956. Robertson, Donald B. Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History Volume III: Oregon and Washington. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers, 1986- c1995 Stein, Harry H. Salem: A pictorial History of Oregon's Capital. Norfolk, Virginia: The Donning Company Publishers, 1981. Wilson, Neill and Frank Taylor. Southern Pacific: The Roaring Story of a Fighting Railroad. New York, New York: McGraw- Hill Book Co., 1952. Yenne, Bill. The History of the Southern Pacific. New York: Smithmark, 1994. Magazine Articles Elliott, Huger " Modern City Gates" The Architectural Review, May 1912, pp 49- 56. Richardson, W. Symes. " The Terminal – The Gate of the City" Scribner's Magazine, July- December 1912, pp 401- 442. Eberlin, Harold D. " Recent Railway Stations in American Cities" The Architectural Record, August 1914, pp 99- 127. " Architectural Beauty in the Civic Gateway of Today" Craftsman Magazine, April 1915, pp 78- 91. Beach, W. W. " Railway Stations of Moderate Size" The Architectural Forum, May 1926, pp 251- 272. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 9 Page 2 Newspaper Articles " Southern Pacific Depot Being Moved – Relic of Pre- Historic Age Doomed to Pass Into Realms of Oblivion" The Oregonian, December 5, 1917. " New Depot to be Completed Early in Week" The Oregon Statesman, September 22, 1918. " Salem, Oregon Finally Gets New Passenger Depot" Telegraph, September 23, 1918. " Hoover Visits Oregon After Long Absence" The Oregon Statesman, September 25, 1934. Reports Mid- Willamette Valley Council of Governments. Salem Passenger Rail Station Study: Final Report. Undated ( ca. 1993) Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number 10 Page 1 VERBAL BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION The Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station encompasses approximately 2.71 acres within the University Addition to the City of Salem, block 44 on portions of lots 3- 7, block 45 on portions of lots 1- 3 and 6- 8, and block 49 on portions of lots 4- 6, tax lot 2402 ( map number 073W26CB02402). BOUNDARY JUSTIFICATION The boundaries include those resources have been historically associated with the Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Index Page 1 INDEX TO DOCUMENTS 1. USGS Map, Salem, Figure 1. 2. Assessor Map, Marion County, 073W26CB002402, Figure 2. 3. Site Plan and Floor Plan, Salem Southern Pacific Railway Station, Figures 3- 4. 4. Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, Salem, 1926, Figure 5. 5. Historic photographs, Salem Railway Station, c. 1900 and 1952, Figures 6- 7. 6. Historic photograph, Salem Southern Pacific Railway Station, 1960, Figure 8. 7. Historic photographs, West Salem Depot, c. 1900; and Southern Pacific Freight Station, 1958, Figures 9- 10. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 1 Figure 1. Salem Southern Pacific Rai lroad Station, USGS Map, Salem. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 2 Figure 2. Assessor Map, Marion County, 073W26CB002402. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 3 Figure 3. Salem Southern Pacific Railway Station, Site Plan. Figure 4. Salem Southern Pacific Railway Station, Floor Plan. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 4 Figure 5. Sanborn Fire Insu rance Map, Salem, 1926. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 5 Figure 6. 1889 Salem Depot in c. 1900. Horse- drawn wagons await on the front side. Figure 7. A large crowd gathered at the Salem Southern Pacific Railway Station on October 7, 1952 to hear and see presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower on a whistle- stop tour aboard a train referred to as the " Eisenhower Special." Governor Douglas McKay is at his side. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 6 Figure 8. A Southern Pacific passenger train, the Shasta Daylight, is shown arriving at the passenger depot in Salem, Oregon in 1960. The Shasta Daylight had the fastest operating schedule ever operated from Oregon to the San Francisco Bay Area. It left Portland at 7: 45 am, stopped at Salem at 8: 55 am, and arrived in San Francisco at 11: 30 pm. The Oregon State Capital building can be seen to in the background to the right of the railway station. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Documents Page 7 Figure 9. The West Sa lem Depot in c. 1900. Figure 10. The Southern Pacific Freight Station at Ferry and Commercial Streets in Salem, 1958. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station Marion Co., Oregon Name of Property County and State NPS Form 10- 900- a OMB Approval No. 1024- 0018 United States Department of the Interior National Park Service National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet Section number Photographs Page 1 INDEX TO PHOTOGRAPHS Name of Property: Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Station City of Vicinity: Salem County: Marion State: Oregon Photographer: Julie Osborn Date Photographed: July 1 and August 5, 2009 Description of Photograph( s) and number: 1 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, West Elevation View looking southeast 2 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , West Elevation View looking northeast 3 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , East Elevation View looking southwest 4 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , West Elevation View looking southeast 5 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior View looking north 6 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior View looking east 7 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior View looking southeast 8 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior Light Fixture 9 of 11. REA Depot, Northwest Elevation View looking southeast 10 of 11. REA Depot, Northwest Elevation View looking southwest 11 of 11. REA Depot, Detail of roof brackets 1 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, West Elevation 2 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , West Elevation 3 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , East Elevation 4 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , West Elevation 5 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior 6 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior 7 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior 8 of 11. Salem Southern Pacific Railroad Depot , Interior 9 of 11. REA Depot, Northwest Elevations 10 of 11. REA Depot, Northwest Elevation 11 of 11. REA Depot, Detail of roof brackets
Metadata NotesDescription of this work is based initially on documentation supplied by the image provider. It is often the case with gift slides that very little information is provided. Review and updating of descriptive information by the collection cataloger is ongoing.
Digital CollectionBuilding Oregon: Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest
Source CollectionUniversity of Oregon Libraries
Image SourceOregon State Historic Preservation Office
PublisherUniversity of Oregon Libraries
File NameOR_Marion_Salem_SalemSouthernStation.pdf
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